Tree of the Week

The Sawtooth Oak

By Sheereen Othman | June 6, 2017

Quercus acutissima

Are you looking for a hardy tree that is seldom troubled by pests or disease? The sawtooth oak is a resilient shade tree with a bit of flare. Native to eastern Asia, the sawtooth oak first made its appearance in America in 1862. The tree starts producing acorns at an early age, making it extremely popular with wild turkeys, squirrels, and other wildlife. But it has more to offer than food value.

The tree boasts a dense canopy with attractive fall color in shades of yellow and golden brown. It’s easy to grow and maintain and does well in numerous conditions including slight drought. What makes this tree stand out is its serrated, oblong leaves — suggestive of how it earned its common name.

In the Landscape

The sawtooth oak is a large tree, reaching up to 60 feet in urban settings. It’s fast growing and yields huge quantities of 1-inch acorns in the fall. It does best in full sun and is adaptable to many soil variances (hardiness zones 5-9). Planters beware, the mass acorns may cause a litter problem which may be of concern when planted near sidewalks, gutters, or driveways.

Catch up on Northern Red Oak: A Tree of Ease.

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